Safari in iOS 12 and Mojave turns into password manager

In the new operating systems iOS 12 and macOS Mojave, Apple will add significantly more functions to the Safari web browser, which may make other software such as password managers superfluous. This is shown by public pre-releases of the browsers.

Safari in iOS 12 and Mojave turns into password manager

In the new operating systems iOS 12 and macOS Mojave, Apple will add significantly more functions to the Safari web browser, which may make other software such as password managers. This is shown by public pre-releases of the browsers.

The Safari web browser will now check passwords for duplicates and warn users not to use the same password in different places. It is also useful to point out where the planned password has been used so far. This also gives the user the option of changing it if necessary.

Many users use the same password for multiple websites because it’s easier to remember. A password manager actually makes this superfluous, but it becomes apparent time and again that users do not bother to correct this faux pas.

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The password manager integrated into Safari will help here in the future. The recycling of passwords from different pages “is not secure”, it says in the administration of the browser.

The support goes so far that Safari offers a password change and directs the user to the affected website so that he can take action there.
If you want to see the whole thing, you can download the public Safari Technology Preview 59 for macOS High Sierra and don’t have to wait for the public beta of macOS Mojave.

In Safari Technology Preview 59, users and web developers can see what’s in store for them in terms of improved tracking protection. Safari 11 already includes an anti-tracking feature, but the new version is also designed to prevent like-buttons and similar elements that website operators can embed in their pages.

This could be a race between advertisers and Apple, as Safari does not have blacklists, but the browser tries to detect and prevent cross-site-tracking. Measures could also be taken by the opposite side to trick Apple’s algorithms, with Apple even using Artificial Intelligence to detect advertising tracking measures.