Intel 10nm roadmap likely to evoke Alder Lake, Tiger Lake and DG1 in 2020

A leak reveals a roadmap dedicated to the Intel 10nm etching process. The company plans to launch several products based on this technology.

After five years of operation, 14 nm will gradually disappear from Intel’s catalog. The next step is 10 nm, and several products are planned.

Intel 10nm roadmap likely to evoke Alder Lake, Tiger Lake and DG1 in 2020

Intel 10nm: All the new technologies totally replacing 14nm

According to Intel documents leaked in Chinese social networks, the company plans to use this technology for its “Alder Lak” desktop chips, its “Tiger Lake” mobile processors, its Xeon Scalable Ice Lake solutions, its DG1 GPUs and its “Snow Ridge” SoC processor.

Intel 10nm roadmap likely to evoke Alder Lake, Tiger Lake and DG1 in 2020

Alder Lake is evoked around heterogeneous configurations that combine high-performance cores with more economical cores. This idea is not new, as it has been used in the smartphone (ARM) processor market for several years. The meeting could take place on the occasion of the release of the 12th generation core for desktop PCs.

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Intel 10nm roadmap likely to evoke Alder Lake, Tiger Lake and DG1 in 2020

Recent leaks on this subject have led to a new socket, the LGA 1700, and solutions combining up to 8 “large” cores and 8 “small” cores, all with TDP from 80 to 125 W. “Willow Cove” or “Golden Cove” are proposed for the “big” hearts against “Tremont” or “Gracemont” for the smaller hearts. Support for PCIe 4.0 would be on the agenda. There are some questions on the RAM page. Should we expect DDR5 support?

Tiger Lake” will be the successor of “Ice Lake”. It will implement “Willow Cove” in a homogeneous configuration alongside an iGPU based on the next Xe graphics architecture. “Ice Lake-SP is Intel’s next “Pro” architecture and Snow Ridge is an SoC targeting 5G base stations.

If these documents are interesting, we have to take a step back. The coronavirus pandemic has probably turned this Intel 10 nm roadmap upside down.

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