Project Anaheim: Microsoft is developing its own “Chrome browser” to replace Edge

Anaheim is the codename for the ongoing project to bury Microsoft internet explorer. According to The Verge, Microsoft is developing its own version of the Chrome browser, which serves as the new default browser for Windows 10.

Project Anaheim: Microsoft is developing its own “Chrome browser” to replace Edge

The software giant first introduced the Edge browser three years ago, redesigned it to replace IE and modernized the standard browsing experience to compete with Chrome and other browsers.

Project Anaheim: Microsoft will finally accept Chrome

Although Edge’s modern look is already satisfactory, the underlying navigation engine (EdgeHTML) is hard to compare to chrome. Microsoft finally abandoned it and replaced the standard Windows 10 browser with Chromium.

According to the US technology website The Verge, Microsoft will announce its Chromium navigation plan as soon as possible to improve compatibility with the Windows network.

Windows Central was the first company to report these internal codes under the code name Anaheim. We know Microsoft is increasingly disappointed with Edge’s network compatibility issues, and businesses and consumers have put pressure on the company to improve.

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With the popularity of the Android operating system and the rise of Chrome on PCs and Macs, Chrome is now the most popular browser among all devices. Chrome has become a new IE6, and web developers have always preferred to use their rendering engine to optimize their websites.

Google has also developed a web service that uses only Chrome for the simple reason that its engineers have contributed to many networking standards, making it often the first company to adopt new networking technologies.

As a result, Microsoft’s rendering engine was left behind, and the company was finally ready to admit it. There is evidence that Microsoft is about to introduce Chrome on Windows because its engineers worked with Google to support Chrome on Windows operating systems supported by ARM.

The use of chrome as the default rendering engine for Windows 10 ends Microsoft’s hostility to Chrome. Microsoft often sends notifications to Windows 10 users and tries to convince them not to use Chrome, and has removed the Google Chrome installer from the Windows Shop for violating its guidelines.

These strategies limit competing browsers and force them to use only Microsoft’s edge rendering engine.